How to Revive a Mushy Succulent?

Wondering how to revive a mushy succulent? Mushy succulents are disappointing, but don't throw them away! Still, some succulent plants are easier to fix than others. Here are tips on what to do when your succulents go soft.

A mushy succulent can be a result of several different factors. Succulents are desert plants and they naturally do not have much moisture in their tissues because of the heat and lack of rain. If a succulent gets too wet or is exposed to excess humidity, it will dry out and become mushy. When this happens, the best thing to do is get it back into a growing medium that will help maintain its moisture level.

So, how do you revive a mushy succulent? The best way to revive a mushy succulent is to cut off the bottom of it and place it in soil that is well-draining. Ensure the soil is not too wet, but moist enough for it to stay healthy. Mist the succulent with water every day or two and place it in a sunny area that provides good air circulation. The fastest way to revive a mushy succulent is by planting it outside where it can get more direct sunlight than inside of your home and will have access to potting soil that is well-draining.

Reviving a mushy succulent is not as complicated as many would want to believe. This article offers a few simple steps to follow and will help you in reviving your mushy succulent. It will also offer you some insight on how to maintain your succulent so that it does not become mushy again.

Causes of a mushy succulent

A mushy succulent can mean a number of things:

The succulent was in too much humidity for an extended period of time. Excess humidity causes the succulent tissues to dry out and become mushy. This is the most common reason for a mushy succulent. The best remedy for this is to cut off the bottom of it and place it in soil that will maintain its moisture.

-The succulent was exposed to sunlight for too long or not enough. Excessive exposure can cause sunburn because plants cannot stop generating energy, which burns tissues on the surface of plant leaves. This causes them to dry out and become mushy. If it is not too severe, the best remedy for this is to cut off the bottom of it and place it in soil that will maintain its moisture.

If your succulent is exposed to excessive amounts of sunlight, it may get mushy over time.

-There are not enough roots on the bottom and top sections to support it.  This usually happens when a person takes a cutting from another plant without transferring some root tissue with it.  If this is the case, you can try to root the section in a new pot with soil. Doing so will help it stay healthy and will encourage the growth of roots.

-The succulent is infested with bugs or disease, which can also cause mushy succulent or even rotting leaves and roots. If this is the case, you’ll need to use pesticides on them in order for your succulent tissues not to dry out and become mushy.  Do not use soap-based insecticides as they may kill your plants.  The best option is to choose a pesticide that contains Neem, which will help control the bugs and prevent future infestations.

-The succulent has been in one spot for too long.  If the plant is out of water or experiencing some other type of stress, it will produce roots along its stems so that it can better anchor itself to survive until conditions improve around it. This results in a mushy succulent because the new roots are in contact with water and less likely to wither.

-The succulent had been completely submerged in water for an extended period of time.  Such extended contact with water will cause the plant to wilt and become mushy. The best remedy for this is to cut off the bottom of it and place it in a well-draining soil mix.

Use well-draining soil for your succulents to prevent them from having extended contact with water.

-The succulent was exposed to extreme temperatures for an extended period of time. Plants cannot survive in areas that have low or high heat, so they will turn brownish and die from exposure if left unattended.

-The succulent was exposed to an insecticide or something else toxic for an extended period of time.  If this is what caused your mushy plant, then you need to figure out how quickly the chemicals are being absorbed and how long it will take to completely eradicate them.

-The succulent was exposed to salt for an extended period of time, which may cause major damage if left unattended.  Plants cannot survive when they come into contact with saltwater or other salty material because their tissues become dry and mushy. When this happens, you should cut off the bottom of it and place it in soil that will maintain its moisture.

-The succulent may be too old or have been neglected for an extended period of time.  If this is what caused your mushy plant, then you need to figure out how quickly the tissues are drying out and if they’re irreparable. In case they are not reparable, it may be time to replace your succulent.

-The succulent may be too small and immature for its environment, so it is not getting enough water to survive or has been exposed to something toxic that is causing the tissues in its leaves to dry out.  If this is the case, you should remove it from your current location and place it somewhere with better conditions where there is plenty of water and the air is not too hot.

How long does it take for a mushy succulent to revive back?

A mushy succulent can mean several different things, but all of them result in the plant’s tissue becoming dry, mushy, and unhealthy-looking. The best way to avoid this is to take steps at once so that you can revive your succulent before it does too much damage to itself and becomes irreparable. This early intervention will help your plant return to its former glory in no time.

The time taken for a mushy succulent to revert back to its healthy condition will depend on the cause of its dryness and mushiness. If you know what caused it then take appropriate measures to remedy it as soon as possible, or else your plant will continue to suffer until there is nothing left for you to do but replace it.

Reviving a mushy succulent can take from a few days to around one month, depending on its dryness.

Generally, it will take a few days to completely revive your succulent if it is just suffering from exposure or neglect. It may take up to two weeks for the tissue in its leaves to become healthy again if it has been exposed to something toxic, and up to one month of constant care before it revives itself if you have not yet determined what caused its dryness and mushiness. This is only a general guideline, so make sure to check on your succulent regularly and keep track of how long it is taking for it to come back.

How to avoid experiencing a mushy succulent

A mushy succulent can be detrimental to your plant but you can easily avoid getting a mushy succulent in the first place. The following steps will help you avoid the hassle that goes into reviving a mushy succulent.

-Maintain a healthy and well-balanced diet with ideal amounts of water to ensure that your succulent is getting the nutrients it needs to stay strong. Keep an eye on its appearance because you may be able to identify signs before they become too obvious.

Make sure your succulent receives adequate amounts of water to prevent it from becoming mushy.

-Find an environment conducive for your succulent’ needs: if you are experiencing low or high temperatures then move your plant somewhere with better conditions; contact someone who can help identify whether something toxic has come into contact with it.

-Find a succulent that is the right size for your environment: if you have a small and immature plant then remove it from its current location to somewhere with better conditions where there is plenty of water and the air isn’t too hot.

-When watering, do not let your plant’s soil dry out completely but don’t water too much either. The goal is to keep the soil moist but not soaked because this will cause its tissue to turn dry and mushy as well.

-Finally, make sure that you’re giving your succulent enough sunlight so it can thrive in an otherwise healthy environment. If possible, move it away from places where there are too many toxic fumes or where it is exposed to the sun for too long.

Succulent is generally a non-problematic plant but it can get mushy and unhealthy if it is exposed to something toxic or faces neglected. If neglecting your succulent has caused the tissue in its leaves to dry out, then taking care of this problem will be a matter of giving it plenty of water while making sure that harmful substances don’t come into contact with it again. Reviving a mushy succulent is not a difficult task to undertake if you know what the cause is, and it will only take a few days for your plant’s tissues to become healthy again.

Last update on 2022-12-23 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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