9 Types Of Haworthia For The Beginning Gardener

Haworthia is a small succulent (sometimes called a "living fossil") that comes in a variety of textures and colors. Recently becoming very popular, it makes a wonderful houseplant.

Native to parts of South Africa, the Haworthia genus features over 70 different types of species. These plants are relatively easy to grow and care for, making them one of the most popular houseplants in different parts of the world. Generally, Haworthia requires less light than other succulents to thrive. These plants usually form a star-like rosette with inconspicuous white flowers.

So, what are some of the best types of Haworthia to grow? Since there are over 70 different types of Haworthia, choosing the right type for your home can sometimes be challenging. But don’t worry because we are here to help you. Some of the best types of Haworthia to grow include Haworthia attenuata, Haworthia Setata, Haworthia Cooperi, and Haworthia cymbiformis. Others include Haworthia Limifolia, Haworthia Truncata, Haworthia obtusa, Haworthia Coarctata, and Haworthia Concolor.

This blog post discusses some of the best types of Haworthia to grow at home and what you need to do to keep them happy and healthy. Keep reading to learn more.

Haworthia vs. Aloe vs. Agave

Before we dive deep into discussing some of the best types of Haworthia to grow at home, it is essential to understand the differences between Haworthia, Aloe, and Agave because these plants look similar. It is pretty easy to confuse one for the other.

Visually, aloe vera and agave plants look fairly similar to the human eye. They both fall into the category of succulents that form rosettes. In fact, some people believe that aloes are basically agave without weapons (they don’t have spikes and strong teeth).

Haworthia plant in a black pot.
Haworthia and aloe vera have similar-looking long stems.

However, these succulents belong to different families, and even their flowers look different. Haworthia and aloe vera have similar-looking long stems, but the leaves of Haworthia are more pointed and greener, with relatively intense white encrustations running horizontally.

Additionally, Haworthia plants have rusty tips and form tight rosettes, while aloe vera and agave have flat-leaf tips.

Sometimes, the common aloe vera plant can look different from other aloe types, such as the aloe variegate, commonly referred to as Tiger Aloe.

There is also a species within the aloe family known as Haworthia-leaved aloe, whose sharp spines usually give it a fuzzy appearance. Its spines are sharper than the usual ones.

The Haworthia-leaved aloe resembles some plants in the Haworthia family, but it doesn’t belong there. Therefore, it might cause some confusion if you are not careful.

Though slightly different in appearance, these plants are good companions because they have similar care requirements, and all of them are slow-growing succulents. Therefore, you can combine them in your succulent arrangement.

Best Types of Haworthia to Grow

So, what are some of the best types of Haworthia to grow at home? Let us find out.

1. Haworthia coarctata

Haworthia coarctata resembles a hand clenched in a fist. It has prominent, reddish leaves and claws that join to form tight clusters. It can easily turn pink in extreme cold or with sufficient light, and produces offsets quite easily.

This succulent also has white horizontal stripes on its deep green leaves. The plant is commonly referred to as Haworthiopsis Coarctata and can grow to a height o up to 30 cm.

A Haworthia coarctata
It has prominent, reddish leaves and claws that join to form tight clusters.

Haworthia Coarctata requires well-prepared cactus compost soil, minimal watering, and exposure to full sun to thrive in a home environment. The minimum temperature should be 25oF.

2. Haworthia attenuata

Haworthia attenuata is among the most popular Haworthia types that are relatively easy to grow. The clump-forming perennial succulent makes a magnificent windowsill container display with its spiky and flesh stems. Its spines/leaves have pointed edges, and white horizontal stripes adding to its fine, rich texture.

The plant produces long, tubular, white flowers. Typically, flower petals start to form on mature plants from spring to fall. Haworthia attenuata can grow to a height of up to 8cm and can spread up to 30cm.

Since its leaves are relatively stiff, the succulent can survive for a prolonged time without water, but you still need to water it regularly in summer and autumn. Allow the potting mix to dry completely between watering sessions and water sparingly in winter.

The minimum temperature should be kept above 50oF and provide sufficient exposure to light. You should also consider re-potting your Haworthia attenuata every three years in spring when root-bound.

3. Haworthia cymbiformis

Haworthia cymbiformis is a wonderful succulent plant that resembles Aloe Vera. It has distinctive flesh stems covered with pointed leaves.

Typically, the plant grows to about 2cm tall and 9 inches wide though it can grow up to 5 cm tall in some cases. The flowers are dark-red on reddish stalks.

A Haworthia cymbiformis
Haworthia cymbiformis is a wonderful succulent plant that resembles Aloe Vera.

This succulent plant is easy to grow and can be a beautiful addition to a windowsill with strong light. For strong growths, the soil should be well-drained and less acidic.

4. Haworthia Cooperi

Haworthia Cooperi is a low-growing succulent with fine leaves that form rosettes. It is among the best types of Haworthia to grow indoors and looks terrific in a hanging basket or pot display.

The plant produces pinkish flowers with white filaments from summer to autumn.

Haworthia Cooper thrives in low to medium light conditions, warm temperatures, and it is highly tolerant of drought.

For watering, allow the top of the potting mix to dry out completely between watering sessions and water sparingly.

The minimum temperature should be kept above 60oF and provide sufficient exposure to light, such as in a spot where they receive at least six hours of direct sunlight every day.

A Haworthia Cooper
It is among the best types of Haworthia to grow indoors.

This succulent spreads slowly and can grow to a height of up to 15 cm over several years.

5. Haworthia Obtusa

Haworthia obtusa is a low-growing succulent plant that stays compact and produces offsets. The plant has triangular leaves with dark green lines running along the length of each leaf. It produces flowers from August to September, which are white with pinkish stalks.

The ideal temperature range for this type of Haworthia should be 80oFand below. It needs well-drained soil and thrives in low light conditions.

Water sparingly and allow the top of the potting mix to dry out before re-watering it. The minimum temperature should be kept above 60oF and provide sufficient exposure to light, such as in a spot that receives at least three hours of direct sunlight every day.

6. Haworthia Limifolia

Haworthia Limifolia is among the easiest types of Haworthia succulents that you should consider growing. This is because of its ease in cultivation, and it is a less fussy succulent that tolerates poor, dry soil.

The plant does not require much maintenance and can survive in different conditions ranging from low light to full sun exposure.

The Haworthia Limifolia is an active grower during autumn and produces small sweetly-scented white flowers during early summer.

A Haworthia Limifolia
It is among the easiest types of Haworthia succulents.

The succulent can grow to a height of 10cm, but its spread is dependent on the number of offsets it produces.

This type of Haworthia requires regular watering and drainage in the winter months, but switch to light watering throughout spring and autumn.

7. Haworthia Marginata Variegated or Zebra Cacti

Haworthia Marginata Variegated is among the most popular types of cacti. It can easily adapt to different growing conditions and features distinctive triangular leaves with white margins.

The plant produces pinkish flowers from winter to early summer, and during the winter months, the leaves turn a reddish-brown color.

The Haworthia Marginata Variegated can spread to a height of 20cm and can survive in a minimum temperature of about 50oF.

For watering, allow the top of the potting mix to dry out completely between watering sessions and water sparingly during the dormancy season.

8. Haworthia Pygmy Variegated

Haworthia Pygmy Variegated is a low-growing succulent with variegated leaves and can make an excellent choice of a potted cacti display for your home.

The plant produces pinkish flowers from early autumn to winter. Haworthia Pygmy Variegated thrives in warm temperatures, bright light, and rich soil with good drainage.

This succulent is known for its drought resistance ability. So, you should only water it when the top of the potting mix is dry.

The minimum temperature should be kept above 10oC and provide sufficient exposure to light. This succulent spreads slowly and can grow to a height of up to 8 cm over several years.

9. Haworthia Turgida

Haworthia turgida is a small cactus with thick triangular leaves that can turn red in winter and spring, but the most notable feature is its tubular white flower during the summer months.

The Haworthia Turgida thrives in low light conditions and can grow to a height of up to 10 cm.

This succulent is known for its drought resistance, and it does not require much watering. Allow the top of the potting mix to dry out completely between watering sessions and water sparingly.

Summary

There are many types of Haworthia that you can grow in your garden. Some have a more prolific growth rate than others, and some may be better suited for certain climates or areas with less rainfall.

We’ve discussed the top 9 best types of Haworthias, based on our experience as experts in gardening and horticulture.   

Knowing which type you want before purchasing is essential as some varieties need more sunlight than others. For instance, those from South Africa require a lot of sunlight while those from Australia prefer shade.

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