8 Golden Rules for Watering the Venus Flytrap

If you’re a new Venus flytrap owner or have had one for a while, this guide is for you! We have listed the 8 golden rules of watering your venus flytrap to keep it happy and healthy in a matter of time.

The Venus flytrap is a carnivorous plant native to the subtropical wetlands of Carolina in the United States. In its natural habitat, the plant grows in nutrient-poor soil and gets a majority of its nutrient requirements from the insects it catches. Therefore, the Venus flytrap is a highly sensitive plant that requires specific watering and feeding requirements.

The most important rule is to water your Venus flytrap when the soil is completely dry. Be careful not to overwater, as this can lead to root rot. Only water the plant with distilled water, rainwater, or deionized water.

Always check the humidity level of your plant’s environment before watering. If the air is too dry, your plant will not be able to absorb enough moisture from the soil and may become dehydrated. You must also be careful not to splash water on your plant’s leaves, as this can cause fungal growth.

Interested in learning more about how to water your Venus Flytrap plant? This article has it all.

Venus Flytrap General Water Requirements

Before we dive into the details of watering and caring for your Venus flytrap, it is essential to understand the plant’s natural habitat and water requirements.

The Venus flytrap is native to the wetlands of North and South Carolina. In its natural habitat, the plant grows in nutrient-poor soil and gets a majority of its nutrient requirements from the insects it catches.

Venus flytrap
Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), carnivorous plant

The plant is highly sensitive to water and light. One mistake in the watering can be fatal for the plant.

Typically, the plant thrives in moist soil with a humidity level of around 60%. In the wild, the plant gets its water from rain and local streams.

When grown at home, Venus Flytrap prefers a humid environment but can tolerate periods of dryness. If the air is too dry, your plant will not be able to absorb enough moisture from the soil and may become dehydrated.

Therefore, you need to be careful not to overwater or underwater your plant. The general rule is to water your Venus flytrap when the soil is completely dry.

Golden Rules for Watering the Venus Flytrap Plant

Now that you understand the general water requirements of the Venus flytrap, let us take a look at the golden rules for watering this sensitive plant.

1. What Type of Water Should I Use?

In its natural habitat, the plant grows in water high in minerals. However, Venus flytrap prefers distilled water, rainwater, or deionized water when grown at home. Do not use tap water as it contains chlorine and other chemicals that can harm the plant.

If you do not have access to distilled or deionized water, you can let tap water sit for 24 hours so that the chlorine has a chance to evaporate.

Water in a container.
Do not use tap water as it contains chlorine and other chemicals that can harm the plant.

However, you are highly encouraged to collect as much rainwater as possible during the rainy season and store it safely for watering your Venus flytrap plant. Rainwater is free of harmful chemicals and contains beneficial minerals for the plant.

2. How Often Should I Water?

Generally, you should water your Venus flytrap when the soil is completely dry. Be careful not to overwater, as this can lead to root rot.

It is best to check the soil moisture level every few days to get a better idea of when your plant needs watering. To do this, stick one of your fingers into the potting mix. If it feels dry to the touch, it is time to water the plant.

If you are unsure whether the soil is dry, err on the side of caution and do not water the plant. It is better to underwater your plant than overwater it.

3. Avoid Overwatering

You must avoid overwatering your Venus flytrap plant at all costs. Overwatering is the leading cause of death for Venus flytraps.

If you overwater your plant, the roots will start to rot. This will lead to a decrease in the plant’s ability to absorb nutrients and water. As a result, the leaves will turn yellow and eventually die.

A plant being overwatered.
If you overwater your plant, the roots will start to rot.

Ensure the soil is completely dry before watering your plant to avoid overwatering. In addition, it is best to use a well-draining potting mix and drain any excess water from the pot after watering.

If you think you have overwatered your plant, stop watering it immediately and let the soil dry out completely. Once the soil is dry, you can resume watering your plant according to the schedule.

4. Avoid Underwatering

While overwatering is the leading cause of death for Venus flytraps, underwatering is the second most common reason these plants die.

Underwatering can stress the plant and lead to a decrease in its ability to catch insects. In addition, the leaves will start to turn yellow and eventually die.

To avoid underwatering your plant, make sure to water it when the soil is completely dry. In addition, it is best to use a well-draining potting mix and drain any excess water from the pot after watering.

A kid watering the plant.
To avoid underwatering your plant, make sure to water it when the soil is completely dry.

If you think you have underwatered your plant, water it immediately, then resume your regular watering schedule.

5. Avoid Getting Water on the Leaves

One of the facts about Venus flytraps is that the leaves are covered in tiny hairs that are sensitive to the touch. When these hairs are triggered, the leaf will close around the item that touched it.

If water droplets fall on the leaves and trigger the hairs, the Venus flytrap will use up energy to close the leaves. Over time, this can stress the plant and lead to death.

To avoid getting water on the leaves, water the soil around the base of the plant. Do not pour water directly on the leaves or let the leaves touch the water in the pot.

If the leaves get wet, gently shake off the excess water or use a paper towel to blot them dry.

6. What Time Should I Water My Plant?

The best time to water your Venus flytrap plant is early morning. This will give the plant time to absorb the water before the hot sun evaporates it. Aim for the hours between 6 and 10 am.

In addition, watering in the morning will prevent the leaves from staying wet for too long. Wet leaves are more susceptible to fungal diseases such as powdery mildew.

If you cannot water your plant in the morning, you can water it in the evening. Just be sure to avoid watering at night, as this can promote fungal growth.

If you must water in the evening, do so early enough so that the leaves have time to dry before nightfall.

7. Use the Right Watering Method

There are different watering methods you can use for your Venus flytrap plant. The best method is to water the soil around the base of the plant using a watering can or hose with a shower head attachment.

Avoid using a sprinkler or pouring water directly on the leaves, as this can trigger the hairs and cause the plant to close its leaves. In addition, avoid using a watering can with a fine nozzle, as this can also trigger hairs. If you use a hose, keep the water pressure low to avoid damaging the leaves.

Alternatively, use the bottom watering method. To do this, fill a tray with water and place the pot in the tray. Allow the plant to soak up the water from the bottom for about 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, remove the pot from the tray and allow any excess water to drain out. Bottom watering is a good option if you are worried about water getting on the leaves. However, be sure not to leave the pot in the water for too long, or the roots may start to rot.

8. Monitor Your Plant for Signs of Stress

Overwatering or underwatering your plant can stress it and lead to death. In addition, other factors such as heat, cold, or draughts can also stress the plant.

Monitor your plant for signs of stress, such as wilting leaves, yellowing leaves, or slow growth. If you notice any of these signs, take action to correct the problem.

For example, if your plant is wilting, water it immediately. If the leaves turn yellow, this could signify too much or too little water. Check the soil to see if it is too dry or too wet, and adjust your watering schedule accordingly.

Venus flytrap in a whale pot.
Common causes of stress include excessive heat or cold, lack of light, or poor drainage.

If you notice that your plant is not growing as quickly as it should, this could be a sign of stress. Try to identify the cause of the stress and take action to correct it.

Common causes of stress include excessive heat or cold, lack of light, or poor drainage. Once you have identified the cause, take steps to fix the problem.

Summary

Venus Flytraps can be sensitive, but it’s a rewarding plant if you learn to care for their water needs. By following these simple rules, you can ensure that your Venus flytrap stays healthy and happy.

Remember to use rainwater or distilled water only, water when the soil is dry, and fertilize sparingly, if at all.

Last update on 2024-02-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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