6 Golden Rules for Watering Your Kalanchoe

Give your Kalanchoe the perfect watering schedule to get the most out of its blooms. Be sure to water thoroughly when the soil is dry, and don't let these plants sit in soggy soil. Follow these 6 golden rules and your Kalanchoe will be happy in no time.

The Kalanchoe is a beautiful succulent native to Madagascar. It is a popular houseplant since it’s relatively easy to care for and does not require a lot of water or attention to thrive. However, even though the Kalanchoe is a drought-tolerant plant, it still needs to be watered regularly to stay healthy. Failure to do so can result in the plant becoming wilted, yellow, and eventually dying.

You should only water your Kalanchoe when the soil is dry. Be sure to water deeply without overdoing it. Use the bottom-up watering method to avoid getting water on the leaves. After watering, allow the excess water to drain out of the pot before putting the succulent back in its place. Also, allow the plant to dry out completely between watering sessions.  

If you adhere to strict watering, your Kalanchoe is sure to thrive. Read on to learn some basics of watering this precious plant.

Kalanchoe: General Watering Requirements

Before we dive deep into discussing the golden rules of watering a Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana plant, it is essential to understand the plant’s general watering requirements.

The Kalanchoe is a drought-tolerant succulent that can store water in its leaves. This means that it does not require as much water as other plants. However, it still needs to be watered regularly to stay healthy.

Generally, you should only water your Kalanchoe when the soil is dry. This succulent does not like to sit in wet soil. Be sure to water deeply but careful not to overdo it as this might cause other problems that might be fatal.

Indoor kalanchoe near the windor.
The Kalanchoe is a drought-tolerant succulent that can store water in its leaves.

If you are unsure whether or not the soil is dry, stick your finger about an inch into the potting mix. You don’t need to water the plant if it feels moist. If it feels dry, then it is time to water.

Some of the critical factors that determine the watering frequency of a Kalanchoe are the plant’s size, potting mix, and weather. For example, a small Kalanchoe in a fast-draining potting mix will need to be watered more often than a large Kalanchoe in a slow-draining potting mix.

Temperature also plays a role in how often you need to water a Kalanchoe. The plant will need to be watered more often in warmer weather and less often in cooler weather.

The best way to determine how often to water your Kalanchoe is to pay attention to the plant and its leaves. It’s time to water the plant if the leaves start to wilt, turn yellow, or turn brown.

Golden Rules for Watering a Kalanchoe

 Proper watering of your Kalanchoe needs you to adhere to some rules so you avoid making any fatal mistakes. To care for your kalanchoe plant with proper watering, you need to follow these rules:

1. Watering Frequency

You should only water your Kalanchoe when the soil is dry. To check if the soil is dry, stick your finger about an inch into the potting mix. It is time to water the plant if it feels dry to the touch.

If you are unsure whether or not the soil is dry, you can also check the leaves of the plant. You should also water your succulent if the leaves are wilting, turning yellow, or brown.

A person watering the kalanchoe.
It is time to water the plant if the soil feels dry to the touch.

You need to avoid overwatering your Kalanchoe. This plant does not like to sit in wet soil, and too much water can cause serious root rot issues. If you think you have overwatered your plant, allow the excess water to drain out of the pot before putting the succulent back in its place.

2. Watering Method 

When watering a Kalanchoe, be sure to water deeply but be careful not to overdo it. The best way to water this succulent is to use the bottom-up watering method.

To do this, simply place the pot in a sink or container of water and allow the plant to soak up water from the bottom.

Be sure to remove the plant from the water after a few minutes so it does not sit in wet soil for too long, as this can lead to root rot issues.

After watering, allow the excess water to drain out of the pot before putting the succulent back in its place.

Alternatively, use the soak-and-dry method. This involves watering the plant until the soil is saturated and then allowing it to dry out completely before watering again. This method is best for Kalanchoe plants placed in pots with drainage holes.

3. Reduce Watering During Winter

One of the golden rules for watering a Kalanchoe is to reduce watering during winter. This is because the plant goes dormant in winter and does not need as much water.

If you live in an area with a winter climate, you can reduce the watering frequency of your Kalanchoe to once every few weeks. Keep an eye on the plant and water it when the soil is dry.

Houseplant in the windowsill during winter.
If you live in an area with a winter climate, you can reduce the watering frequency of your Kalanchoe to once every few weeks.

The plant will generally show signs of underwatering if it is not getting enough water. These signs include wilting leaves, yellowing leaves, and brown edges on the leaves.

If you notice any of these signs, water your plant immediately.

4. Use Rainwater or Distilled Water

The type of water you use can significantly impact your plant’s health. It’s best to use rainwater or distilled water for watering as these types of water do not contain chemicals or minerals that could harm the plant.

You are advised to collect rainwater in advance and store it in a rain barrel or other container for future use.

If you don’t have access to rainwater, then you can use distilled water instead. This can be easily purchased from a grocery store or online.

If you cannot get hold of rainwater or distilled water, you can use tap water.

However, let the tap water sit out for 24 hours before using it on your plant. This will allow the chemicals in the water to dissipate and make it safe for your Kalanchoe.

5. Water Deeply

When you water your Kalanchoe, give it a good soaking. This means you should water until the water runs out of the bottom of the pot. This ensures that the plant’s roots get enough water and helps avoid problems such as root rot.

It is best to water your Kalanchoe in the morning, so the plant has time to dry out during the day. Aim for the hours between 6:00 am and 10:00 am for watering.

Watering in the evening can cause the plant to stay too wet overnight, leading to problems such as root rot.

If you cannot water during this time, water in the early afternoon. Avoid watering late in the day, as this can cause the plant to stay too wet overnight.

6. Pay Attention to the Plant

As with any plant, it is essential to pay attention to your Kalanchoe and look for signs that it is not getting enough or too much water.

If the leaves of your plant are wilting, yellowing, or turning brown, then this is a sign that it is not getting enough water. On the other hand, if the leaves are mushy or soft, then this is a sign that the plant is getting too much water.

Kalanchoe in a pot.
If the leaves are mushy or soft, then this is a sign that the plant is getting too much water.

It is crucial to act quickly if you see any of these signs, as Kalanchoes are very sensitive to changes in watering.

If you think you have overwatered your plant, allow the excess water to drain out of the pot before putting the succulent back in its place.

6. Fertilizing Kalanchoe Plants

Kalanchoe plants don’t need to be fertilized often, and too much fertilizer can actually harm the plant. It’s best to only fertilize your Kalanchoe once every two months during the growing season.

To encourage blooming, you can fertilize your Kalanchoe once a month during the blooming season. Just be sure to use a fertilizer that is low in nitrogen, as too much nitrogen can prevent flowers from forming.

Kalanchoe wrapped in a cloth.
If you see that the leaves of your Kalanchoe are yellowing or browning, this is a sign that you are over-fertilizing the plant.

When applying fertilizer, follow the instructions on the package, as different fertilizers have different application rates.

Also, water the plant before applying fertilizer, as dry soil can cause the fertilizer to burn the roots of the plant.

If you see that the leaves of your Kalanchoe are yellowing or browning, this is a sign that you are over-fertilizing the plant. Cut back on the amount of fertilizer you use, and be sure to flush the soil with water to remove any excess fertilizer.

Bottom Line

Watering a Kalanchoe is not difficult, but there are some golden rules that you should follow to ensure that your plant stays healthy.

Be sure to water only when the soil is dry, use the bottom-up watering method, and reduce watering during winter.

Also, use rainwater or distilled water for watering as these types of water do not contain chemicals or minerals that could harm the plant.

By following these simple watering tips, you will be sure to keep your Kalanchoe healthy and happy. Your plant is sure to reward you with beauty.

Last update on 2022-11-19 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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